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    There are 9 cases available...

    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20070724201543 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
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    Discussion
     
    Ectopic Thymus
    Veronika Huf, Kurt Vollert, Tobias Schuster. Ectopic Thymus. PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 7.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070724201543


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] There are OP-Situs-images available for this case. [ OP-Situs ] There are Histology-images available for this case. [ Histology ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    Veronika Huf (Klinikum Augsburg/Abteilung Kinderradiologie/Augsburg/Deutschland), Kurt Vollert (Klinikum Augsburg/Abteilung Kinderradiologie/Augsburg/Deutschland), Tobias Schuster (Klinikum Augsburg/Abteilung Kinderchirurgie/Augsburg/Deutschland)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    6 Months  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Male  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    Neck-Other and unknown  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    congenital  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    Swelling in the right mandibular angle, movable, indolent,stable size for over 2 months.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    Normal development: Cells of the ventral bud of the 3rd pharyngeal pouch detach and migrate in the 8th gestational week caudally and medially towards the thyroid. They migrate further retrosternally into the superior mediastinum.

    Development of ectopic thymus tissue:
    1. Cells detach along the descensus path and proliferate -> development of accessory thymus tissue.
    2. The entire gland or a lobe does not descend and stays at loco -> ectopic thymus tissue.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.



     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    Surgery / Histo  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    Hemangioma, Metastasis, Teratoma, Sarcoma, Thyroid tumor  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    Ectopic thymus tissue is more frequently prevalent than traditionally suggested. With improved diagnostic modalities (e.g. ultrasound) the diagnosis is more frequently made. 61 % of 18 children who were examined in the neck area had ectopic thymus tissue in the neck according to the literature (see reference). Since we were sensitized for this diagnosis, we diagnosed at least 4 children with ectopic thymus tissue as an incidental finding.
    Rarely, a malignant transformation of ectopic thymus tissue has been described in the literature. Thus, in our opinion is a conservative/awaiting position with follow up imaging studies justified.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    1. Medline: Medline
    Chu WXW, Metreweli C
    Ectopic thymic tissue in the paediatric age group
    Acta Radiologica 2002;43:144-6  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    ectopic thymus,neck swelling,accessory thymus  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    Veronika Huf, Kurt Vollert, Tobias Schuster. Ectopic Thymus. PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 7.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070724201543  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: accessory thymus&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field: Neck-Other and unknown
    or in the region: Neck
    or in the tissue/organ: Other and unknown
    or with the etiology: congenital
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] There are OP-Situs-images available for this case. [ OP-Situs ] There are Histology-images available for this case. [ Histology ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Ectopic Thymus
    Veronika Huf, Kurt Vollert, Tobias Schuster. Ectopic Thymus. PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 7.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070724201543


     

    Search similar cases in:
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    Ectopic Thymus
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   

    Ectopic Thymus  
     
    Ectopic Thymus
    Veronika Huf, Kurt Vollert, Tobias Schuster. Ectopic Thymus. PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 7.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070724201543


     
     
    Ectopic Thymus
    Veronika Huf, Kurt Vollert, Tobias Schuster. Ectopic Thymus. PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 7.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070724201543


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Ectopic Thymus
    Veronika Huf, Kurt Vollert, Tobias Schuster. Ectopic Thymus. PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 7.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070724201543


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20070611231443 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
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    Discussion
     
    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)
    Susanne Oechsle, Kurt Vollert. Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070611231443


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are CT-images available for this case. [ CT ] There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    Susanne Oechsle (Klinikum Augsburg/Abteilung Kinderradiologie/Augsburg/Germany), Kurt Vollert (Klinikum Augsburg/Abteilung Kinderradiologie/Augsburg/Germany)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    5 Years  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Female  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    History: Fall on the back of the head 11 days ago. According to mother she developed increased swelling in the left occipital area. There are no neurological deficits.
    Physical examination: Painful palpable left occipital swelling.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    Eosinophilic granuloma is the most common and the least severe varient of the Langerhans Cell histiocytosis. Most commonly found in the skull, femur pelvis, ribs and vertebral column. Most monostotic - in 20% of the cases there are multiple masses. Included in the Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis spectrum are the multisystemic forms - Abt-Letterer-Siwe and the Hand-Schüller-Christian illnesses. (I)

    The eitology of the Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis is still unclear. There is a reactice proliferation and/or accumulation of dendritic cells. Assumingly, there is an intercellular communication defect with cytokine-disregulation. As of now, there is no proof of malignancy. (II)

    X-ray morphology is mainly dependent on the stage of the eosinophilic granuloma. Morphology is very diverse, including aggressive as well as latent and active growth patterns possible.
    In the calvarium, there are usually round or oval osteolyses with diameters up to 3 cm. Most are sharply demarcated, as if "punched" through, but in the acute phase there are also unsharp borders possible. In the healing phase, one may find border sclerosis (50%). Bony leftovers in the mid-section of the lesion are seen as button sequesters. In a severe case, there may be a "map-like" picture. (I)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast



     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    Lymphoma, solitary bone metastasis of a Neuroblastoma  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    Treatment options in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis: Surgical excision in a solitary skeletal mass (II). Intralesional steroid injection have been tried with questionable results (I). In multisystemic masses and multiple bony lesions, a systemic treatment with corticosteroids, cytostatics and immunosuppressives. Radiation only as a last resort (II).

    The course and prognosis of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis:
    Monosystemic lesions independent of the treatment have a good prognosis. Multisystemic lesions with organ dysfunction in particularly small children is seen as having a poor prognosis, with possible lethal course. (II)

    Eosinophilic granulomas are mostly seen between the ages of 5 and 10 years. Male gender predominates (makes up of about 60-80% of all Langerhans Cell Histiocytoses). (II)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    In this case, there was an unnoticed development of a eosinophilic granuloma in the skull. After trauma, there was hemorrhaging and pain, then the noticed swelling on the left, occipital side.
    Final diagnosis and treatment was accomplished through resection of the mass.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    (I) Bohndorf, Imhof, Fischer:
    Radiologische Diagnostik der Knochen und Gelenke.
    Thieme Verlag 2006. S. 208-209.
    (II) Staatz, Honnef, Piroth, Radkow:
    Kinderradiologie. In: Pareto-Reihe Radiologie.
    Thieme Verlag 2007. S. 257-262.
     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    solitary osteolysis of the skull, langerhans cell histiocytosis, LCH, eosinophilic granuloma, lymphoma, neuroblastoma, swelling of head  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    Susanne Oechsle, Kurt Vollert. Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070611231443  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: swelling of head&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are CT-images available for this case. [ CT ] There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)
    Susanne Oechsle, Kurt Vollert. Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070611231443


     

    Search similar cases in:
    More links about this topic on Pubmed  More links about this topic on Yahoo  More links about this topic on Altavista  More links about this topic on MSN  More links about this topic on Google  More links about this topic on Fireball

    Peer-reviewed Radiology Search



    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   

    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)  
     
    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)
    Susanne Oechsle, Kurt Vollert. Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070611231443


     
     
    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)
    Susanne Oechsle, Kurt Vollert. Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070611231443


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH)
    Susanne Oechsle, Kurt Vollert. Eosinophilic granuloma / monostotic bone lesion of a langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). PedRad [serial online] vol 7, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20070611231443


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20040414134304 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
    Add this case to your RSS feeder: Subscribe to RSS feed Add to Yahoo Add to Google Add to AOL Add to Furl Subscribe to Feed Burner feed

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    Discussion
     
    Splenic Lymphangioma
    Dirk Schaper, P Göbel. Splenic Lymphangioma. PedRad [serial online] vol 4, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20040414134304


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are OP-Situs-images available for this case. [ OP-Situs ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    Dirk Schaper, P. Göbel (Kinderchirurgie St. Barbara-Krankenhaus Halle/S.)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    14 Years  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Female  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    The first presentation of the then 9 year-old girl was based upon unspecific lower abdominal pain. Chance findings in the routine sonographic examination. Initially, the findings were just watched, with follow-ups every quarter year. As the findings were found to increase in size at the age of 13, ultrasound aspiration was done and a short-term drainage was performed. An instillation of a locally acting substance was performed. In the follow-up examination, the structures decreased in size. After 6 months, however, a renewed increase in size was noted and a renewed aspiration was performed. Since the pathological findings remained, a surgical treatment was performed.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings

     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    Posttraumatic splenic cyst, dermoid cyst, cystic hemangioma, parasitic cyst  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    After the initially performed aspiration without success, the surgical treatment and resection of the splenic lymphangioma was opted. A sufficiently large splenic rest could be saved.
    All in all, a splenic lymphangioma is a very seldom illness. Aside from the casuistics in children, isolated splenic lymphangiomas are described mostly in adults. A lymphangiomatosis, which is described often in literature, could not be found in our patient.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    In the experience we gathered in this case, the multicystic changes of the spleen could no longer be treated with aspiration-instillation. This is usually shown to be helpful in solitary splenic cysts.
    In childhood, we feel that the resection with saving the spleen was the method of choice.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    3. Medline: Medline
    Morgenstern L, Bello JM, Fisher BL, Verham RP
    The clinical spectrum of lymphangiomas and lymphangiomatosis of the spleen.
    Am Surg. 1992 Oct;58(10):599-604

    4. Medline: Medline
    Wolters U, Keller HW, Lorenz R, Pichlmaier H.
    Splenic cysts: indications for surgery and surgical procedures
    Langenbecks Arch Chir. 1990;375(4):231-4.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Splenic, lymphangioma, spleen, treatment, splenic lymphangioma  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    Dirk Schaper, P Göbel. Splenic Lymphangioma. PedRad [serial online] vol 4, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20040414134304  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: splenic lymphangioma&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are OP-Situs-images available for this case. [ OP-Situs ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Splenic Lymphangioma
    Dirk Schaper, P Göbel. Splenic Lymphangioma. PedRad [serial online] vol 4, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20040414134304


     

    Search similar cases in:
    More links about this topic on Pubmed  More links about this topic on Yahoo  More links about this topic on Altavista  More links about this topic on MSN  More links about this topic on Google  More links about this topic on Fireball

    Peer-reviewed Radiology Search



    Splenic Lymphangioma
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   

    Splenic Lymphangioma  
     
    Splenic Lymphangioma
    Dirk Schaper, P Göbel. Splenic Lymphangioma. PedRad [serial online] vol 4, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20040414134304


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)



        Total answers: 13

     
    Splenic Lymphangioma
    Dirk Schaper, P Göbel. Splenic Lymphangioma. PedRad [serial online] vol 4, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20040414134304


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Splenic Lymphangioma
    Dirk Schaper, P Göbel. Splenic Lymphangioma. PedRad [serial online] vol 4, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20040414134304


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20031110211430 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
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    Discussion
     
    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I
    M Paetzel. Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 11.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20031110211430


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are CT-images available for this case. [ CT ] There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    M. Paetzel (Cleveland/USA)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    11 Years  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Male  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    11 year old boy, fall from a tree, abdominal pain, therefore admission under presumption of a blunt abdominal trauma.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    Parynchmal hemorrhage of the liver without affection of the capsule appears often near the teres hepatis ligament, due to a natural fixation, where the gravitational effects are appearant.

    The lesion is scaled as a Grade I of the Organ Injury Scale (OIS).

    The free intraperitoneal fluid shows that the rupture is not solely intraparenchymal. (A hemorrhage that was within the liver capsule (subcapsular hemorrhage) was not seen, so through this proof of free fluids, a lesion in the liver capsule must be assumed.)

    On the whole, only about a half of the organ's lesions were detected with ultrasound. Only through the use of CT or MRI (without contrast!) could the hemorrhages be correctly found.

    Ultrasound could thus be seen as the main modality of detecting intraperitoneal fluid.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Evidence of a small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.





    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Evidence of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the Morrison-space.




    Ultrasound 4 <- view Ultrasound 4

    Ultrasound 4: Liver: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of echogenity lateral to the Lig. teres hepatis. This finding cannot be definitely categorized as pathologic.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-weighted (HASTE) transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-weighted (FLASH) without contrast transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis..





    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: transversal after KM: Presentation of a mild, but after contrast significantly demarcated hypoperfusion right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.


     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    none  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    In slight parenchymal hemorrhages, there is often no other findings. Posttraumatic cysts or bilomas are rare.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Traumatic, liver hemorrhage, grade I, bleeding, bleed, hemorrhage, liver, fluid, trauma, traumatic grade I liver hemorrhage  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    M Paetzel. Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 11.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20031110211430  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: traumatic grade I liver hemorrhage&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are Ultrasound-images available for this case. [ Ultrasound ] There are CT-images available for this case. [ CT ] There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I
    M Paetzel. Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 11.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20031110211430


     

    Search similar cases in:
    More links about this topic on Pubmed  More links about this topic on Yahoo  More links about this topic on Altavista  More links about this topic on MSN  More links about this topic on Google  More links about this topic on Fireball

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    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   
    Search M. Paetzel in Medline M. Paetzel (26)   

    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I  
     
    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I
    M Paetzel. Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 11.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20031110211430


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)


    • Hemorrhage from the liver parenchyma
      Votes: 13 (41 %)


    • Incidental finding of a hemangioma
      Votes: 4 (12 %)


    • Incidental finding of an echinococcosis
      Votes: 1 (3 %)


    • Incidental finding of a focal fatty degeneration
      Votes: 0 (0 %)



        Total answers: 31

     
    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I
    M Paetzel. Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 11.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20031110211430


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I
    M Paetzel. Traumatic liver hemorrhage grade I. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 11.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20031110211430


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20030602162043 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
    Add this case to your RSS feeder: Subscribe to RSS feed Add to Yahoo Add to Google Add to AOL Add to Furl Subscribe to Feed Burner feed

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    Discussion
     
    Duodenal atresia
    H Eberhardt, S Kallsen. Duodenal atresia. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030602162043


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are X-Ray-images available for this case. [ X-Ray ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    H. Eberhardt (Marburg), S. Kallsen (Landshut)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    Preterm  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    Premature infant in the 36. week of gestation. On the 5th day of life, recurrent spitting and loss of weight of 15% since birth.
    Only meconium passage, no transitional stools.

    Abdomen was somewhat distended, otherwise unnoticeable examination.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    Inherent disorder  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Evidence of a small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.





    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Evidence of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the Morrison-space.




    Ultrasound 4 <- view Ultrasound 4

    Ultrasound 4: Liver: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of echogenity lateral to the Lig. teres hepatis. This finding cannot be definitely categorized as pathologic.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-weighted (HASTE) transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-weighted (FLASH) without contrast transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis..





    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: transversal after KM: Presentation of a mild, but after contrast significantly demarcated hypoperfusion right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.



    X-Ray 1 <- view X-Ray 1

    X-Ray 1: "Double bullbe" phenomenon in the abdominal overview (Stomach and proximal duodenum is filled with air).


     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    Duodenal atresia, annular pancreas  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    Pediatric-surgical correction: Duodeno-duodenostomy, Duodeno-jeunostomy. In some cases a duodenal membrane can form.

    Finding other malformations before an surgical procedure is important.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    5. Medline: Medline
    Saxena A, Willital GH, Lehmann RR
    Chirurgie im Kindesalter; S.243-251 und 259ff in Willital GH, Lehmann RR, 1. Auflage
    Spitta Verlag, 2000
     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Duodenal stenosis, small intestinal atresia, duodenal atresia, recurrent spitting, recurrent vomiting, distended, no stool passage  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    H Eberhardt, S Kallsen. Duodenal atresia. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030602162043  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: no stool passage&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are X-Ray-images available for this case. [ X-Ray ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Duodenal atresia
    H Eberhardt, S Kallsen. Duodenal atresia. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030602162043


     

    Search similar cases in:
    More links about this topic on Pubmed  More links about this topic on Yahoo  More links about this topic on Altavista  More links about this topic on MSN  More links about this topic on Google  More links about this topic on Fireball

    Peer-reviewed Radiology Search



    Duodenal atresia
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   
    Search M. Paetzel in Medline M. Paetzel (26)   
    Search H. Eberhardt in Medline H. Eberhardt (20)   
    Search S. Kallsen in Medline S. Kallsen (2)   

    Duodenal atresia  
     
    Duodenal atresia
    H Eberhardt, S Kallsen. Duodenal atresia. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030602162043


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)


    • Hemorrhage from the liver parenchyma
      Votes: 13 (41 %)


    • Incidental finding of a hemangioma
      Votes: 4 (12 %)


    • Incidental finding of an echinococcosis
      Votes: 1 (3 %)


    • Incidental finding of a focal fatty degeneration
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Jejunal stenosis
      Votes: 4 (5 %)


    • Ilial stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Colon stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Duodenal stenosis
      Votes: 29 (41 %)


    • Gut perforation
      Votes: 2 (2 %)



        Total answers: 70

     
    Duodenal atresia
    H Eberhardt, S Kallsen. Duodenal atresia. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030602162043


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Duodenal atresia
    H Eberhardt, S Kallsen. Duodenal atresia. PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 6.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030602162043


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20030501212143 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
    Add this case to your RSS feeder: Subscribe to RSS feed Add to Yahoo Add to Google Add to AOL Add to Furl Subscribe to Feed Burner feed

    Bookmark and Share


    Discussion
     
    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)
    W Weiwad, A Jassoy. Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis). PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 5.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030501212143


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    W. Weiwad, A. Jassoy (Halle)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    Nanosomia, therefore a tumor in the hypophysial region or a maldevelopment of the pituitary gland must be ruled out.

    In addition, absence epilepsy and mental retardeation - therefore diagnostic imaging to rule out an intracerebral tumor or an intracranial anomaly.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Evidence of a small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.





    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Evidence of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the Morrison-space.




    Ultrasound 4 <- view Ultrasound 4

    Ultrasound 4: Liver: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of echogenity lateral to the Lig. teres hepatis. This finding cannot be definitely categorized as pathologic.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-weighted (HASTE) transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-weighted (FLASH) without contrast transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis..





    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: transversal after KM: Presentation of a mild, but after contrast significantly demarcated hypoperfusion right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.



    X-Ray 1 <- view X-Ray 1

    X-Ray 1: "Double bullbe" phenomenon in the abdominal overview (Stomach and proximal duodenum is filled with air).



     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 1: T1-SE saggital before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 2: T1-SE saggital after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary gland (adenohypophysis) shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.


     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    The diagnoses of a pituitary infantilism was made based on the STH deficiency shown in laboratory findings.
    For other symptoms (epilepsy, mental retardation), there were no imaging correlations as to the cause of such.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Neurohypophysis, STH-Deficiency, Ectopia, cctopic neurohypophysis, nanosomia, absence epilepsy, mental retardeation,posterior pituitary gland, posterior pituitary  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    W Weiwad, A Jassoy. Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis). PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 5.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030501212143  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: posterior pituitary&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)
    W Weiwad, A Jassoy. Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis). PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 5.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030501212143


     

    Search similar cases in:
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    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   
    Search M. Paetzel in Medline M. Paetzel (26)   
    Search H. Eberhardt in Medline H. Eberhardt (20)   
    Search S. Kallsen in Medline S. Kallsen (2)   
    Search W. Weiwad in Medline W. Weiwad (21)   
    Search A. Jassoy in Medline A. Jassoy (6)   

    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)  
     
    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)
    W Weiwad, A Jassoy. Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis). PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 5.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030501212143


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)


    • Hemorrhage from the liver parenchyma
      Votes: 13 (41 %)


    • Incidental finding of a hemangioma
      Votes: 4 (12 %)


    • Incidental finding of an echinococcosis
      Votes: 1 (3 %)


    • Incidental finding of a focal fatty degeneration
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Jejunal stenosis
      Votes: 4 (5 %)


    • Ilial stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Colon stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Duodenal stenosis
      Votes: 29 (41 %)


    • Gut perforation
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Astrocytoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Hamartoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Ectopic neurohypophysis
      Votes: 13 (13 %)


    • Teratoma
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Epidermoid
      Votes: 2 (2 %)



        Total answers: 93

     
    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)
    W Weiwad, A Jassoy. Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis). PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 5.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030501212143


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis)
    W Weiwad, A Jassoy. Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Gland (Ectopic Neurohypophysis). PedRad [serial online] vol 3, no. 5.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20030501212143


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20020815182432 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
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    Discussion
     
    Lung sequestration, extralobar
    H Frimmel. Lung sequestration, extralobar. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020815182432


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    H. Frimmel (Halle/S.)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    21 Months  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Male  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    1 9/12 year-old boy. Reoccurring respiratory infections. In the X-ray (sent to us from another clinic), segmental, basal opacities on the left side.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    Pulmonary sequester = "Rokitansky-lobe"
    Congenital malformation of the lung.
    A mass of non-aerated pulmonary tissue that is not connected to the normal bronchial tree. It receives its own blood supply from a systemic artery.
    In 65% of the cases in the left lobe, otherwise in the right, posterior lower lobular segment.
    Two forms:
    Intralobular (75-85%) - without own pleura, drainage into the pulmonary veins.
    Extralobular (15-25%) - with own pleura, drainage into the vena cava/azygos vein.
     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Evidence of a small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.





    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Evidence of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the Morrison-space.




    Ultrasound 4 <- view Ultrasound 4

    Ultrasound 4: Liver: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of echogenity lateral to the Lig. teres hepatis. This finding cannot be definitely categorized as pathologic.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-weighted (HASTE) transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-weighted (FLASH) without contrast transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis..





    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: transversal after KM: Presentation of a mild, but after contrast significantly demarcated hypoperfusion right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.



    X-Ray 1 <- view X-Ray 1

    X-Ray 1: "Double bullbe" phenomenon in the abdominal overview (Stomach and proximal duodenum is filled with air).



     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 1: T1-SE saggital before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 2: T1-SE saggital after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary gland (adenohypophysis) shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-HASTE coronal: conically configurated, ca. 4x2cm large structure in the left dorsobasal lung, In the T2-weighted image, an obvious signal intensity increase is seen.







    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-FLASH coronal with contrast: strong, homogenic, aortic synchronized enhancement of the sequestration after application of contrast. No aerated areas within this structure.







    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.













    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.









    MRI 5 <- view MRI 5

    MRI 5: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.










     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    In obvious sequester-vascular supply: none.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    Congenital deformity.
    Often secondary hematogenic infection with delayed healing and sustained inflammatory symptoms due to missing aeration (no self-cleaning).
    Mostly, surgical resection. Sometimes also prophylactically due to the danger of infection.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    The presented case is the classical example of a lung sequester. Here, probably an extralobular sequester.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    6. Medline: Medline
    M. Galanski, M. Prokop
    Ganzkörper-CT
    Georg-Thieme-Verlag 1998

    7. Medline: Medline
    Psychrembel
    Klinisches Wörterbuch, 256. Auflage
    de Gruyter-Verlag 1990  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Lung sequester, extralobular, Rokitansky lobe, Rokitansky, lung sequestration, recurrent respiratory infections  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    H Frimmel. Lung sequestration, extralobar. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020815182432  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: recurrent respiratory infections&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Lung sequestration, extralobar
    H Frimmel. Lung sequestration, extralobar. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020815182432


     

    Search similar cases in:
    More links about this topic on Pubmed  More links about this topic on Yahoo  More links about this topic on Altavista  More links about this topic on MSN  More links about this topic on Google  More links about this topic on Fireball

    Peer-reviewed Radiology Search



    Lung sequestration, extralobar
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   
    Search M. Paetzel in Medline M. Paetzel (26)   
    Search H. Eberhardt in Medline H. Eberhardt (20)   
    Search S. Kallsen in Medline S. Kallsen (2)   
    Search W. Weiwad in Medline W. Weiwad (21)   
    Search A. Jassoy in Medline A. Jassoy (6)   
    Search H. Frimmel  in Medline H. Frimmel (23)   

    Lung sequestration, extralobar  
     
    Lung sequestration, extralobar
    H Frimmel. Lung sequestration, extralobar. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020815182432


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)


    • Hemorrhage from the liver parenchyma
      Votes: 13 (41 %)


    • Incidental finding of a hemangioma
      Votes: 4 (12 %)


    • Incidental finding of an echinococcosis
      Votes: 1 (3 %)


    • Incidental finding of a focal fatty degeneration
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Jejunal stenosis
      Votes: 4 (5 %)


    • Ilial stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Colon stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Duodenal stenosis
      Votes: 29 (41 %)


    • Gut perforation
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Astrocytoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Hamartoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Ectopic neurohypophysis
      Votes: 13 (13 %)


    • Teratoma
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Epidermoid
      Votes: 2 (2 %)



        Total answers: 93

     
    Lung sequestration, extralobar
    H Frimmel. Lung sequestration, extralobar. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020815182432


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Lung sequestration, extralobar
    H Frimmel. Lung sequestration, extralobar. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020815182432


     


    Go to the top of the page   ID: 20020814135433 Original case in english  More links about this topic on Pubmed (PubMed Reader)
    Add this case to your RSS feeder: Subscribe to RSS feed Add to Yahoo Add to Google Add to AOL Add to Furl Subscribe to Feed Burner feed

    Bookmark and Share


    Discussion
     
    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction
    A Meyer-Bahlburg, Carsten Bock. Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020814135433


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    A. Meyer-Bahlburg (Halle), Carsten Bock (Halle)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    1 Years  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Female  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    2.5 year-old girl with acute, incomplete hemiparalysis of the right side. Up until now, the child developed normally. Sensitivity lost in the right arm and leg region.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    This deals with fluid filled cavities within the arachnoid. Most frequently, this occurs in the middle cranial fossa (about 2/3 of the cases, left more frequent than right), furthermore, in the sella region and in the posterior cranial fossa.

    Arachnoid cysts are more commonly associated with cerebral anomalies (hypoplasia of the temporal lobe), where it is unclear if these are primarily or secondarily formed.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Evidence of a small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.





    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Evidence of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the Morrison-space.




    Ultrasound 4 <- view Ultrasound 4

    Ultrasound 4: Liver: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of echogenity lateral to the Lig. teres hepatis. This finding cannot be definitely categorized as pathologic.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-weighted (HASTE) transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-weighted (FLASH) without contrast transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis..





    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: transversal after KM: Presentation of a mild, but after contrast significantly demarcated hypoperfusion right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.



    X-Ray 1 <- view X-Ray 1

    X-Ray 1: "Double bullbe" phenomenon in the abdominal overview (Stomach and proximal duodenum is filled with air).



     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 1: T1-SE saggital before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 2: T1-SE saggital after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary gland (adenohypophysis) shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-HASTE coronal: conically configurated, ca. 4x2cm large structure in the left dorsobasal lung, In the T2-weighted image, an obvious signal intensity increase is seen.







    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-FLASH coronal with contrast: strong, homogenic, aortic synchronized enhancement of the sequestration after application of contrast. No aerated areas within this structure.







    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.













    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.









    MRI 5 <- view MRI 5

    MRI 5: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.











    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: (T2-FLAIR-Sequence, transversal): Large, temporally located cyst on the left side (5.5 x 8 x 8.5 cm), which causes a median shift due to compression of the left lateral ventricle.







    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1 SE-coronal after contrast application: Cystic mass in the left temporal lobe, which is seen compressed.







    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: T2-FLAIR transversal following surgery: Expansion of the previously compressed temporal lobe. In this slice, one sees the complete cerebral parenchymal filling of the area where the cyst was previously located.







    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: T2- TSE-FS transversal following surgery: Expansion of the previously compressed temporal lobe. In this slice, one sees the complete cerebral parenchymal filling of the area where the cyst was previously located.
    In the area of of the lenticulostratal artery on the left side there is a striped area of infarction - assumed to be a result of the expansion and compression of the cyst (yellow arrow).




    MRI 5 <- view MRI 5

    MRI 5: T1-SE coronal after contrast application: After surgical windowing, a regression of size of the cyst is seen. There is no median shift. After windowing, a hygroma (left) is seen parietally (often after removal of cysts). Here one sees the area of infarction as well (arrow).

     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    Occurs about 1:1000; male:female about 2:1
    Symptoms depend on the localisation
    With small cysts, no symptoms (chance findings)
    With large cysts, macrocephalus, developmental retardation, change in personality, seizures, headaches, paralysis, bitemporal hemianopsy, hydrocephalus or cerebellar (nystagmus, ataxia).

    Treatment: Relief of the cyst by windowing or shunt placement.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    Windowing of the arachnoid cyst in the basal cisterns.

    In the course of a few days after windowing, there was a complete regression of the incomplete hemiparalysis, complete regeneration of the sensibility.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    8. Medline: Medline
    Gosalakkal
    Intracranial Arachnoid Cysts in Children: A review of pathogenesis, clinical features, and management
    Pediatr Neurol 2002;26::93-98  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Loss of sensibility, sella, skull, arachnoidal cyst, cerebral infarction, brain, stroke, CVA, arachnoid cyst  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    A Meyer-Bahlburg, Carsten Bock. Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020814135433  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: arachnoid cyst&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction
    A Meyer-Bahlburg, Carsten Bock. Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020814135433


     

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    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   
    Search M. Paetzel in Medline M. Paetzel (26)   
    Search H. Eberhardt in Medline H. Eberhardt (20)   
    Search S. Kallsen in Medline S. Kallsen (2)   
    Search W. Weiwad in Medline W. Weiwad (21)   
    Search A. Jassoy in Medline A. Jassoy (6)   
    Search H. Frimmel  in Medline H. Frimmel (23)   
    Search A. Meyer-Bahlburg in Medline A. Meyer-Bahlburg (17)   
    Search Carsten Bock in Medline Carsten Bock (9)   

    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction  
     
    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction
    A Meyer-Bahlburg, Carsten Bock. Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020814135433


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)


    • Hemorrhage from the liver parenchyma
      Votes: 13 (41 %)


    • Incidental finding of a hemangioma
      Votes: 4 (12 %)


    • Incidental finding of an echinococcosis
      Votes: 1 (3 %)


    • Incidental finding of a focal fatty degeneration
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Jejunal stenosis
      Votes: 4 (5 %)


    • Ilial stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Colon stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Duodenal stenosis
      Votes: 29 (41 %)


    • Gut perforation
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Astrocytoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Hamartoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Ectopic neurohypophysis
      Votes: 13 (13 %)


    • Teratoma
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Epidermoid
      Votes: 2 (2 %)



        Total answers: 93

     
    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction
    A Meyer-Bahlburg, Carsten Bock. Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020814135433


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




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    Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction
    A Meyer-Bahlburg, Carsten Bock. Arachnoid cyst as a cause of cerebral infarction. PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 8.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020814135433


     


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    Discussion
     
    Renal abscess (E.coli)
    M Uhl. Renal abscess (E.coli). PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020404174345


     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAuthor/s:

    M. Uhl (Freiburg)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesEmail Address:

    Viewable for logged on visitors (Log on)  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesAge:

    15 Years  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesGender:

    Female  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRegion-Organ:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesMost likely etiology:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesHistory:

    15 year-old girl with fever, pyuria, leucocyturia, bacteruria in mid-stream urine (E. coli).  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesPathomorphology or Pathophysiology of this disease :

    85% of all UTIs in girls are E. coli. Most ascending infections, abscess is a complication of a pyelonephritis.

    Surgery (emergency) with drainage: creamy pus with E. coli.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesRadiological findings:


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the tumor in the right mandibular angle which is hypoechoic and extending deeply into the soft tissue.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: The tumor extends between the neck vessels (internal jugular vein and common carotid artery) without signs of invasion.



    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Good vascularization on Doppler ultrasound



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T1w noncontrast axial; the tumor is nearly isointense to muscle. The hyperintense areas represent predominantly protein-rich cysts or fat.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T2w SPIR axial; The known tumor is hyperintense to muscle.





    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: intraoperative findings of the tumor in the right mandibular angle




    Histology 1 <- view Histology 1

    Histology 1: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Histology 2 <- view Histology 2

    Histology 2: Hassall's bodies in the central portions of the specimen.




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Ultrasound of the back of the head
    Left occipital identified is a 2 cm, subcutaneous, inhomogeneous and hypoechoic mass lesion. In this area, there is about 12 mm cortical discontinuity. Dura appears deviated inferiorly.
    Color coded Duplex sonography: Increased vascularization in the periphery of the lesion. (Images not shown)
    Ultrasound of the abdomen is unremarkable. (Images not shown)




    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: CCT Brain window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    CT 2 <- view CT 2

    CT 2: CCT Bone window
    Left occipital osteolytic lesion with soft tissue components, no further osteodestructive findings.






    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: MRI of the head - T1 axial
    Left occipital soft tissue mass with marked marginal contrast enhancement, size ca. 1,8 x 2,8 x 1,5 cm. It causes the known defect in the posterior skull and mild dural displacement to the inside.
    There is surrounding leptomeningeal contrast enhancement. There is increased T2 signal and fluid level in the center of the lesion, which represents a trauma related secondary hemorrhage.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: MRI of the head - T2 axial






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRI of the head - T1 axial with contrast






    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRI of the head - T1 spir coronal (oblique coronal with surface coil) with contrast




    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Presentation of the pathological findings in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Multicystic structure, which moves well with breathing.




    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of the spleen as a neighboring organ.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Doppler sonographic vascularization




    OP-Situs 1 <- view OP-Situs 1

    OP-Situs 1: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 2 <- view OP-Situs 2

    OP-Situs 2: Surgical findings




    OP-Situs 3 <- view OP-Situs 3

    OP-Situs 3: Surgical findings


    Ultrasound 1 <- view Ultrasound 1

    Ultrasound 1: Evidence of a small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.





    Ultrasound 2 <- view Ultrasound 2

    Ultrasound 2: Presentation of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the suprabubic level.




    Ultrasound 3 <- view Ultrasound 3

    Ultrasound 3: Evidence of small amount of free intraperitoneal fluid in the Morrison-space.




    Ultrasound 4 <- view Ultrasound 4

    Ultrasound 4: Liver: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of echogenity lateral to the Lig. teres hepatis. This finding cannot be definitely categorized as pathologic.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-weighted (HASTE) transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-weighted (FLASH) without contrast transversal: Presentation of a mild diffuse increase of signal intensity right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis..





    CT 1 <- view CT 1

    CT 1: transversal after KM: Presentation of a mild, but after contrast significantly demarcated hypoperfusion right lateral to the Ligamentum teres hepatis.



    X-Ray 1 <- view X-Ray 1

    X-Ray 1: "Double bullbe" phenomenon in the abdominal overview (Stomach and proximal duodenum is filled with air).



     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 1: T1-SE saggital before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 2: T1-SE saggital after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal before contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk.





     MRI <- view MRI

    MRI 3: T1-SE coronal after contrast media: Depiction of a round hyperintense structure in the course of the pituitary stalk. The anterior pituitary gland (adenohypophysis) shows a normal position and contrast media absorption.



    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: T2-HASTE coronal: conically configurated, ca. 4x2cm large structure in the left dorsobasal lung, In the T2-weighted image, an obvious signal intensity increase is seen.







    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1-FLASH coronal with contrast: strong, homogenic, aortic synchronized enhancement of the sequestration after application of contrast. No aerated areas within this structure.







    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.













    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.









    MRI 5 <- view MRI 5

    MRI 5: MRA (MIP-Projections): Proof of the systemic arterial vasculature from the aotra and the venous drainage in the hemiazygos vein.











    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: (T2-FLAIR-Sequence, transversal): Large, temporally located cyst on the left side (5.5 x 8 x 8.5 cm), which causes a median shift due to compression of the left lateral ventricle.







    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: T1 SE-coronal after contrast application: Cystic mass in the left temporal lobe, which is seen compressed.







    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: T2-FLAIR transversal following surgery: Expansion of the previously compressed temporal lobe. In this slice, one sees the complete cerebral parenchymal filling of the area where the cyst was previously located.







    MRI 4 <- view MRI 4

    MRI 4: T2- TSE-FS transversal following surgery: Expansion of the previously compressed temporal lobe. In this slice, one sees the complete cerebral parenchymal filling of the area where the cyst was previously located.
    In the area of of the lenticulostratal artery on the left side there is a striped area of infarction - assumed to be a result of the expansion and compression of the cyst (yellow arrow).




    MRI 5 <- view MRI 5

    MRI 5: T1-SE coronal after contrast application: After surgical windowing, a regression of size of the cyst is seen. There is no median shift. After windowing, a hygroma (left) is seen parietally (often after removal of cysts). Here one sees the area of infarction as well (arrow).


    Ultrasound1  Mass without echos in the right kidney, measuring  4 x 4 cm.<br / align=
    " align="left" vspace="1" hspace="10">
    <- view Ultrasound1 Mass without echos in the right kidney, measuring 4 x 4 cm.



    Ultrasound1: Mass without echos in the right kidney, measuring 4 x 4 cm.




    MRI 1 <- view MRI 1

    MRI 1: Gradientenecho T1 (FLASH) with contrast, coronal. Liquid mass, softly marcated, no contrast uptake. No urinary problems.





    MRI 2 <- view MRI 2

    MRI 2: Turbospinecho T2 coronal.






    MRI 3 <- view MRI 3

    MRI 3: Turbospinecho T2 transversal :A small fluid level can be seen. The signal is not urine isointense in T1 and T2, so there is no clear cyst or urinoma.

     

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesDiagnosis confirmation:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesWhich DD would be also possible with the radiological findings:

    Complicated kidney cyst with increased protein content.  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesCourse / Prognosis / Frequency / Other :

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesComments of the author about the case:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesFirst description / History:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesLiterature:

    N/A  

     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesKeywords:

    Renal abscess, E.coli, renal, abscess, renal infection, Escherichia coli, kidney infection, fever, pyuria, leucocyturia, bacteruria  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Cite this article:

    M Uhl. Renal abscess (E.coli). PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020404174345  

     
     Pediatric Radiology Cases Read similar articles: bacteruria&type=1-17">corresponding keywords
    in the same field:
    or in the region:
    or in the tissue/organ:
    or with the etiology:
     
     Pediatric Radiology CasesImages to this case: There are MRI-images available for this case. [ MRI ] View all modalities [ All ]   
     
    Renal abscess (E.coli)
    M Uhl. Renal abscess (E.coli). PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020404174345


     

    Search similar cases in:
    More links about this topic on Pubmed  More links about this topic on Yahoo  More links about this topic on Altavista  More links about this topic on MSN  More links about this topic on Google  More links about this topic on Fireball

    Peer-reviewed Radiology Search



    Renal abscess (E.coli)
    Other cases by these authors:

    Search Veronika Huf in Medline Veronika Huf (1)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Tobias Schuster in Medline Tobias Schuster (1)   
    Search Susanne Oechsle in Medline Susanne Oechsle (17)   
    Search Kurt Vollert in Medline Kurt Vollert (2)   
    Search Dirk Schaper in Medline Dirk Schaper (59)   
    Search P. Göbel in Medline P. Göbel (6)   
    Search M. Paetzel in Medline M. Paetzel (26)   
    Search H. Eberhardt in Medline H. Eberhardt (20)   
    Search S. Kallsen in Medline S. Kallsen (2)   
    Search W. Weiwad in Medline W. Weiwad (21)   
    Search A. Jassoy in Medline A. Jassoy (6)   
    Search H. Frimmel  in Medline H. Frimmel (23)   
    Search A. Meyer-Bahlburg in Medline A. Meyer-Bahlburg (17)   
    Search Carsten Bock in Medline Carsten Bock (9)   
    Search M. Uhl in Medline M. Uhl (21)   

    Renal abscess (E.coli)  
     
    Renal abscess (E.coli)
    M Uhl. Renal abscess (E.coli). PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020404174345


     

    Which diagnosis have other collegues guessed?


    • Splenic lymphangioma
      Votes: 6 (46 %)


    • Splenic hemangioma
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Multicystic splenic degeneration
      Votes: 5 (38 %)


    • Echinococcus cyst
      Votes: 2 (15 %)


    • Hemorrhage from the liver parenchyma
      Votes: 13 (41 %)


    • Incidental finding of a hemangioma
      Votes: 4 (12 %)


    • Incidental finding of an echinococcosis
      Votes: 1 (3 %)


    • Incidental finding of a focal fatty degeneration
      Votes: 0 (0 %)


    • Jejunal stenosis
      Votes: 4 (5 %)


    • Ilial stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Colon stenosis
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Duodenal stenosis
      Votes: 29 (41 %)


    • Gut perforation
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Astrocytoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Hamartoma
      Votes: 3 (3 %)


    • Ectopic neurohypophysis
      Votes: 13 (13 %)


    • Teratoma
      Votes: 2 (2 %)


    • Epidermoid
      Votes: 2 (2 %)



        Total answers: 93

     
    Renal abscess (E.coli)
    M Uhl. Renal abscess (E.coli). PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020404174345


     

    Medical Dictionary
    Search in medical dictionary for
    Or type in a keyword
    ( Provided by The On-Line Medical Dictionary )




    1 = less interesting)
     
    Renal abscess (E.coli)
    M Uhl. Renal abscess (E.coli). PedRad [serial online] vol 2, no. 4.
    URL: www.PedRad.info/?search=20020404174345


     




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